STATEMENT

STATEMENT

 

The use of one pesewa coin installations appropriate Ghana's nearly worthless loose change as structural material for raising questions on state policies, economic practices, and the meaning of independence. As part of another measure to cure the economy’s inflation, these coins were introduced in 2007 and have almost no value, and are not accepted by most sellers and informal shops. Ironically, some of the few establishments that use them today are elite supermarkets and stores at the mall. The pesewa creates a paradoxical connection across classes and positions: the currency almost anyone within the system possesses, but which almost no one carries or uses. In my works, thousands of the copper coins are submitted to chemical and natural processes to evoke age and use, then fixed onto supports face-down, the national coat of arms visible. Arrangements formed into geometric shapes, topographic simulations, fluid organic forms and cosmic or cellular bodies that blend or blur. The coins navigate the bureaucracies that continue to demarcate social movements whiles its gleaming cash bank fires urgent embers on these practices and issues. The devalued coin transforms into a mechanism for mapping new possible relations, for inventing a more resourceful future.